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694 N High St
Columbus, OH 43215

614-221-8580

Sherrie Gallerie is a Contemporary Art gallery located in the Short North Arts District of Columbus, Ohio. We specialize in three-dimensional contemporary art including glass, ceramics, wood, fiber, mixed media, and art jewelry.

Ford Forlano

 Ford Forlano, Big Bead Necklace, polymer clay, art jewelry, patterns, red, purple, Sherrie Gallerie

Big Bead Necklace #160

 Ford Forlano, Squiggle Necklace, polymer clay, art jewelry, patterns, red, purple, gold, Sherrie Gallerie

Squiggle Necklace #032

 Ford Forlano, Button Earrings, polymer clay, art jewelry, patterns, red, silver, studs, Sherrie Gallerie

Button Earrings #258

 Ford Forlano, Button Earrings, polymer clay, art jewelry, dots, red, pink, silver, studs, Sherrie Gallerie

Button Earrings #252

 Ford Forlano, Button Earrings, polymer clay, art jewelry, patterns, black and white, silver, studs, Sherrie Gallerie

Button Earrings #246

 Ford Forlano, Squiggle Necklace, polymer clay, art jewelry, purple, red, gold, Sherrie Gallerie

Squiggle Necklace #030

 Ford Forlano, Button Earrings, polymer clay, art jewelry, studs, dots, silver, Sherrie Gallerie

Button Earrings #181

 Ford Forlano, Button Earrings, polymer clay, art jewelry, pink, silver, Sherrie Gallerie

Button Earrings #175

 Ford Forlano, Red Tube Bangle, polymer clay, art jewelry, bracelet, Sherrie Gallerie

Red Tube Bangle

 
 

artist info

"We've noticed threads from our art school days continue to be important. While David's strength has always been to push color, pattern and surface in new directions, Steve is constantly fascinated by three-dimensional structures and how things fit together mechanically. Throughout our collaboration, we have often looked to nature for inspiration. In seed clusters, shell formations, and flower buds, for instance, there are carefully organized parts which are arranged beautifully and made up of numerous, seemingly identical, but unique units. These exquisite structures lead us into new ways of envisioning a necklace, for example, both three-dimensionally and texturally. Many of our brooches are like a collection of fragments. Not necessarily of literal fragments (say, like shards of pottery) but more like "conceptual fragments,"– like a piece of music, a chapter from a story, an ingredient from a cuisine, or an element of a language. At some point, however, we let the references subside a bit and allow the color, abstract patterns and form to lead us. The work feels complete to us when the balance of elements – abstract and imagistic -- comes into focus in some unusual way." -Ford and Forlano