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694 N High St
Columbus, OH 43215


Sherrie Gallerie is located in the Short North Arts District, an area known for one-of-a-kind boutiques, galleries and great cuisine. We strive to show the best in local and national contemporary art. We hope you will come and visit.

Jack Earl

Willy, Wonda, and Junior Worm, porcelain, 7x8x6 in

Happy Birthday Bill.jpg
Happy Birthday Bill side.jpg

Happy Birthday Bill, ceramic, 12.5x7.5x7.5 in

Living On Change, ceramic, SOLD

Shadow and Man, ceramic, 25.5x15.5x12 in

Prissie Dog, ceramic, 13x10x8 in

Jack Earl, Man Made Man, ceramic, Sherrie Gallerie

Man Made Man, ceramic, 27x21x14 in

Grrr, ceramic, 15.5x10x9.5 in

Bronze back.jpg

Jack Earl's Bronze, found object and ceramic, 18x8x6 in

Dog Walk, porcelain, 18x18x14 in

Well Okay, ceramic, 22x14.5x11.5 in

I Wasnt Always.jpg

I Wasn't Always Who I Am, ceramic, 14.5x7.5x9.5 in

Right: Teapot, The Sun Shines, ceramic, 12x8.5x9 in

Teapot The Sun Shines.jpg
Some Cloud.jpg

Some Cloud, ceramic, 10x11x6 in

Delmo Preston, ceramic, 21x11.5x10 in

Where Are You Going Bill, ceramic, acrylic on canvas, 16.5x12.5x7 in

Precipice 2.jpg

Precipice, ceramic, 28x11x11.5 in

Guiding Hand, ceramic, 18.5x15.5x10.5 in

Elvis Teapot, porcelain, 9x10.5x5.5 in

Bill La Fop, ceramic, 10.5x7.5x4.5 in

Moses Contemplating, ceramic, canvas, 28x18x15.5 in

Girl With a Secret, ceramic, found object

Girl With a Secret, front view

Figures With Dog Heads, ceramic, found object

Nativity, ceramic, 12.5x7x7 in


Bouquet, porcelain


Han Made Teapot, porcelain, 14.5x11.5x5 in

Archie, ceramic

Left: Trinket Box - Cat's Tale, porcelain, 6x6.5x6 in

artist info

The subjects of Earl's porcelain sculptures generally are based upon the circumscribed lives and lifestyles of people in his own culturally isolated, small-town world in Ohio. Typically, his ceramic personalities are engaged in humdrum activities in vernacular surroundings. But while he represents life in rural Middle America, he does not depict it from the disassociated vantage point of a social commentator, satirist, or folklorist. Instead, Earl revels in his role as an active participant in ordinary affairs, and while he often pokes fun in his art, he always remains a sensitive recorder of the human condition. Attuned to the metaphoric and symbolic content of the prosaic lives around him, his porcelain individuals are often elevated to the status of Everyman.

Jack Earl was born in Uniopolis, Ohio in 1934. He graduated from Bluffton University with a major in ceramics, then received a Masters in ceramics from The Ohio State University. After graduating, Earl taught at the Art Institute at the Toldeo Museum of Art, and later accepted a position at Virginia Commonwealth University. During his time in Virginia, he was invited to be the first artist-in-residence at the Kohler Factory, funded in part by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. He was later invited back for a second Kohler residency in 1976, and has since received a second National Endowment of the Arts Award, as well as awards from the American Craft Council and the Ohio Arts Council. Earl’s work is included in several public and private collections including the Smithsonian, Columbus Museum of Art, American Crafts Museum, Racine Arts Museum, Art Institute of Chicago, and the LA County Museum of Art.